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Näckrosen and Hallonbergen Stockholm metro stations

Previously: Solna centrum.

I forgot to tell that it was really cold on all the “special” stations. I visited Stockholm in June, it was over 20° and sunny outside, so I was wearing a t-shirt. The five minutes that I spent on the stations between the trains made me almost freeze to death.

The next station is Näckrosen:

This station is all about the stones.

On the one hand it’s beautiful. On the other, it looks unhealthy, as if the station had a really bad rash:

Pictures on the ceiling:

Art:

A bench:

The next station is Hallonbergen:

Cardboard structures:

And kid’s drawings:

A platform. The metal elements are painted pink:

Exit. A compass on the floor:

The perspective:

The pictures are from the trip in June 2016. To be continued.

More Stockholm metro:

Dec 26   Stockholm   Stockholm metro   world

Solna centrum Stockholm metro station

In the previous part you saw this picture:

This is Solna centrum, my favourite Stockholm metro station:

These people have just arrived and go about their business:

Nothing special:

A bench:

A view from one platform to opposite one:

Ads don’t spoil the image:

There is a compass on the floor:

Some elk, or whatever it is, above a glass. Because why not?

Artists’ signature:

There’s black in addition to red and green. Escalators:

A man descending:

On the other end there is also a lift. It doesn’t go vertically, but follows the stairs instead:

More ads:

View upstairs:

The pictures are from the trip in June 2016. To be continued.

More Stockholm metro:

Dec 9   Stockholm   Stockholm metro   world

Stockholm metro trains

First read the introductory post about Stockholm metro. Now, let’s look at the trains.

The new train:

Stadion

The display above the door shows the destination station:

Mind the gap:

Inside:

Closer. Note the pictograms on the door:

Typesetting:

Different angle:

The line diagram on a transparent background next to the doors:

More pictograms:

At stations, the driver leans halfway out of the train to see the people when announcing that the doors are closing:

The old train:

Kungsträdgården

The train at the most incredible station:

Solna centrum

I’ll cover it in the next post.

Inside the old train:

The view in the opposite direction:

The diagram on the ceiling:

The transport system ads:

Simple but effective:

A freight train passes:

The pictures are from the trip in June 2016.

Continued

See also:

Stockholm metro

This is a kind of photos you usually see in blog posts titled “Stockholm metro”:

Rådhuset

You may think that all Stockholm metro is like this. But when you come to Stockholm and go to the metro, what you see is this:

Skanstull

Not all stations are fantastic, you must know where to go. I will get to the good ones, but will start with the other things.

The station entrances are denoted with the letter T, because metro is a “tunnel road” (tunnelbana). The entrance from the central rail station:

T-Centralen

In Swedish, the definite article is expressed as a suffix, including -n, so sometimes you see a funny word tunnelbanan (“the tunnel road”):

The entrance in the old town:

Gamla stan

Another one in the central part of the city:

Medborgarplatsen

The “T” thing itself is of a very nice form:

Gamla stan

And it is glowing at night:

Slussen

A lift at one of the stations:

The map of the metro and suburban trains:

You can find the stations Skanstull, Medborgarplatsen, Slussen, Gamla stan in the centre.

Ticket machines:

There is a unified graphic style for the transport system. I will show the airport and the central railway station later. They all use the same font, the Swedish text is always white and the English one is yellow. But on the metro, only the posters follow this style. Other elements are inconsistent in their design.

Let’s get it. A beautiful font:

A platform. The letters on the display are gigantic. Looks right:

This display informs about escalator direction:

One of the platforms at T-Centralen, where the central railway station is:

A station name:

Now let me guide you to a more impressive platform at the same station. Follow the signs:

Helvetica, rectangles, arrows (the display on the left says “not down”):

And here we are on the platform of the blue T10 and T11 lines:

T-Centralen, blue lines

We’ll get back to this later.

A standard hanging sign with the station name, Helvetica again:

And here’s another style, on a blue background:

The same style is used for remaining stations list:

Another one:

The pictures are from the trip in June 2016.

Сontinued

Berlin U-bahn

See an earlier post on Berlin U-bahn station lettering. Now, to the rest of the U-bahn.

Typical station entrance:

Berlin U-bahn

There is also a tram stop to the left and a train station above the road.

Stadtmitte station has its own entrance sign design:

Berlin U-bahn

A schedule at the entrance:

Berlin U-bahn

Elements of wayfinding inside the stations. The list of the remaining stations of a line:

Berlin U-bahn

Another one:

Berlin U-bahn

No turnstiles, as usual in Germany. To the left of the ticket machine (white and yellow), there is a small validator (yellow and white):

Berlin U-bahn

At the centre of a platform there is usually an element with the station name and exit guide:

Berlin U-bahn

A similarly design element, but wall-mounted:

Berlin U-bahn

Another exit guide design:

Berlin U-bahn

Time to the next train, service information and a clock:

Berlin U-bahn

A compact version:

Berlin U-bahn

Ads:

Berlin U-bahn

Train are yellow:

Berlin U-bahn

All trains have an external speaker (above a window) so that the announcement are heard from the platform. The windows are filled with the pattern of Brandenburg Gate.

Inside an older train:

Berlin U-bahn

Inside an newer train:

Berlin U-bahn

Line diagrams are grouped. 5, 8 & 9:

Berlin U-bahn

6 & 7:

Berlin U-bahn

Apparently, this reduces the production cost. But this format also makes the shown lines more “related” in the eyes of a passenger, even though transfers to other lines are no worse.

A button to open the doors:

Berlin U-bahn

The system map is on the ceiling:

Berlin U-bahn

Hermannplatz station:

Berlin U-bahn

Weberwiese station:

Berlin U-bahn

A train on an elevated structure:

The photos are from the trips of March and May 2016.

More Berlin:

2017   Berlin   world

Berlin street name plates

The main design:

1

Below the main plate there is a place for a nano-plate with addresses range:

2

This one with a red spot can be used as a nice logo:

3

If a street is named after someone, there is an additional plate about them on top:

4

These are two different ligatures:

5
6

Nice name:

7
8

Alternative design:

9
10

Rare beauty:

11

More Berlin:

See also Kiev street name plates.

2017   Berlin   world

Berlin U-bahn station names

Here are some Berlin metro station names (photos from trips of August 2005, April and May 2016).

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

My favourite plate:

16
17
18
19

Animals:

20
21

Another boring one:

22
2017   Berlin   world

Kiev in April 2016, all the rest

Here are the rest photos from Kiev in April 2016 that I wanted to share.

In Kiev, there are several peculiar subways. The stairways from the crossing streets run down in a form of an arc, uncovered. The entrance to the subway is where the stairways meet:

These graphics in one of the subways represent the Ukrainian cities:

A manhole cover:

An airplane pictogram confusingly points in wrong direction:

The university is painted with a crazy colour:

At night it looks infernal:

A sign on a fence:

Wall art:

Another example:

There was an exhibition of painted eggs on a square — many looked beautiful:

Dnipro:

More Kiev:

2017   Kiev   world

Signs and plaques in Kiev

More photos from Kiev.

Listed building:

1

A memorial plaque:

2

A museum:

3

Hand-written posters:

4

Hardware store:

5

A hairdresser’s sign:

6

Another one:

7

Some kind of a special kind of house:

8

Don’t park here:

9

A cafe:

10

M & M:

11, 12

Nice curves:

13

A clothes and vinyl shop:

14

Nice layout:

15
2017   Kiev   signs   wayfinding   world

Kiev street name plates

A characteristic Kiev street name plate looks like this:

1
2

There is a bulb inside, sometimes:

3
4

An old one:

5

An ugly soviet one:

6

The ones on Khreshchatyk look more like car license plates:

7-8

There is also a blue design:

9
10

And also there are these weird boxes at the entrances:

11
12
2017   Kiev   street name plates   world
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